Why Myanmar Military, Ma Ba Tha and NLD are Kowtowing China?

Why Myanmar Military, Ma Ba Tha and NLD are Kowtowing China?

Note: Kowtow, which is borrowed from kau tau in Cantonese (koutou in Mandarin Chinese), is the act of deep respect shown by prostration, that is, kneeling and bowing so low as to have one’s head touching the ground.

Ref: Wikipedia @ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kowtow

What’s up China?
When compare to our other good neighbour, India, you are so cruel on all the countries in South East Asia, including Burma.


You had kicked out or forced out or pushed out almost all the ethnic groups of South East Asia including all the ethnic minorities of Burma/Myanmar and the Bama people’s ancestors. After that you shamelessly bully all of us again by following to our new home land and asked for the protection money or ransom money.


See your neighbour India, it had given the great religions, Hindu, Buddhism and Islam to all the nations of South East Asia including Burma.
India had given culture, arts, literature etc to all of us, including Burma/ Myanmar.
India had just fought two wars in the whole history on our South East Asia. ( We leave behind three wars with China and wars in South Asia.)
( What’s up is an informal question meaning, depending on situation and emphasis: “what are you doing”, “how are you?”, “what is happening” or “what gives.” It is sometimes used as an informal, casual greeting in itself.)
Now I wish to ask China to repent and pay back the the historical debts instead the present shameful stance of its hindrance in our current struggle for the democratization movements against SPDC Junta. China is actively supporting this pariah Junta and protecting this régime in the UNSC.
Please red my article in Burma Digest, C.C.C.C. or C4 ,Communist Chinese Colonialist’s Cruelties with MAHA BANDULA pseudonym to know about the China.
If we look at the China’s long history of aggressive behaviour on its own citizens, neighbours and the world, it is quite alarming. The world must do something to protect itself from this big bully instead of closing one eye to get the big economic opportunity by supporting its one China policy and undemocratic unruly bullying on its neighbours and on its own citizens.
If we look at the history of South East Asia, including almost all of our ethnic minorities of Burma/Myanmar, almost all of us had to migrate down and out of China because of the violent, aggressive Chinese new comers that pushed or forced all of us out.
Later after settling in the new home land, Chinese Kings tried to continue their bully by demanding to pay tributes regularly. Not only Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Tibet, Burma, Thailand, Laos but far away countries like, Philippines, Taiwan, Indonesia, Bengal, Europe, Mecca and Medina are also not spared.
And during the late 60’s and 70’s, just because General Ne Win massacred the Burmese Chinese in the anti-Chinese Riots, they supported the Burmese Communist Party with 100,000 Chinese Red army troops, disguised as Wa rebels.
According to the Burmese language, Peking radio reports, 100,000 Chinese soldiers deserted with full ammunition and joined forces with them. So, the so called, Wa Ethnic Minorities, who could not even speak or understand a word in Burmese, became full citizen now. They could easily get the Myanmar National Registration Cards and many of them even managed to get the Myanmar Passports.
Just look at the various groups of Burmese Muslims’ dilemma in getting the National Registration Cards and Passports. And our cousin brothers, Rohingyas are unfairly discriminated.
Is that because our skin are darker than Chinese?
Is that because our nose are sharper than Chinese?
Is that because we are Muslims and could not assimilate thoroughly like Chinese who could assimilate easily?
Is that because the Burmese girls need not convert if they marry the Chinese?
Although PURE Chinese Nationals who disguised as ‘Myanmar Ethnic Minority’ Wa could grease the hands of Myanmar local and national authorities, just because they-are not-Indian factor and because of their Chinese features paved their way easily.
But anyway please look back the history of South East Asia, India. [We all are not Indians but anyway Burmese Muslims are called Kalas/Indian (people of the Indian sub-continent) mixed blooded people.]
Except for the South India dynasty of Chola’s attack on Indonesia’s Srivijaya and Moghul King Aurangzeb, attacked the Arakan once only. His elder brother Shah Shuja’ was the second son of the Mogul Emperor Shah Jahan who built the famous Taj Mahal of India. Shah Shuja’ lost to his brother and fled with his family and army in to Arakan. Sandathudama (1652-1687 AD), the Arakan King accepted and allow him to settle there but later arrested and killed. Although Aurangzeb was the enemy of the Shah Shuja’, he was upset by the massacre and attacked Arakan.
India and China shaped the present South East Asia, and the Colonial masters polished into the present finished products.
Indianized kingdoms
The concept of the Indianized kingdom, first described by George Coedès, is based upon the Hindu, Buddhist and Islamic cultural and economic influences in Southeast Asia.
Ancient and classical kingdoms
Southeast Asia has been inhabited since prehistoric times. The communities in the region evolved to form complex cultures with varying degrees of influence from India and China.
The ancient kingdoms can be grouped into two distinct categories.
The first is agrarian kingdoms. Agrarian kingdoms had agriculture as the main economic activity. Most agrarian states were located in mainland Southeast Asia.
Examples are the Ayutthaya Kingdom, based on the Chao Phraya River delta and the Khmer Empire on the Tonle Sap.
The second type is maritime states. Maritime states were dependent on sea trade. Malacca and Srivijaya were maritime states. A succession of trading systems dominated the trade between China and India.
First goods were shipped through Funan to the Isthmus of Kra, portaged across the narrow , and then transhipped for India and points west.
Around the sixth century CE merchants began sailing to Srivijaya where goods were transhipped directly. The limits of technology and contrary winds during parts of the year made it difficult for the ships of the time to proceed directly from the Indian Ocean to the South China Sea.
The third system involved direct trade between the Indian and Chinese coasts. Several kingdoms developed on the mainland, initially in modern-day Myanmar, Cambodia and Vietnam.
The first dominant power to arise in the archipelago was Srivijaya in Sumatra. Very little is known about Southeast Asian religious beliefs and practices before the advent of Indian merchants and religious influences from the second century BCE onwards.
• Prior to the 13th century, Buddhism and Hinduism were the main religions in Southeast Asia.
• The Jawa Dwipa Hindu kingdom in Java and Sumatra existed around 200 BCE.
• The history of the Malay-speaking world begins with the advent of Indian influence, which dates back to at least the 3rd century BC. Indian traders came to the archipelago for its forest and maritime products and to trade with merchants from China.
• Cambodia was first influenced by Hinduism during the beginning of the Funan kingdom. Hinduism was one of the Khmer Empire’s official religions.
• Cambodia is the home to one of the only two temples dedicated to Brahma in the world. Angkor Wat is also a famous Hindu temple of Cambodia.
• The Majapahit Empire was an Indianized kingdom based in eastern Java from 1293 to around 1500. Its ruler Hayam Wuruk, (1350 to 1389) dominated other kingdoms in the southern Malay Peninsula, Borneo, Sumatra, Bali and the Philippines.
• The Cholas excelled in maritime activity in both military and the mercantile fields. Their raids of Kedah and the Srivijaya, and they influence the local cultures.
• Many of the surviving examples of the Hindu cultural influence found today throughout the Southeast Asia are the result of the Chola expeditions.
• Despite being culturally akin to Hindu cultures to western historians these kingdoms were truly indigenous and independent of India.
• States such as Srivijaya and the Khmer empire developed territories and economies that rivalled those in India itself.
• Borobudur, for example, is the largest Buddhist monument ever built.
• Despite being culturally akin to Hindu cultures to western historians these kingdoms were truly indigenous and independent of India.
• States such as Srivijaya and the Khmer empire developed territories and economies that rivalled those in India itself.
• Borobudur, for example, is the largest Buddhist monument ever built. Southeast Asian rulers were founders of these states_
• and then imported the Indian ritual specialists as advisers on raja dharma, or the practices of Indian kingship.
• The Indianized kingdoms developed a close affinity
• and internalised Indian religious, cultural and economic practices without significant direct input from Indian rulers themselves.
• Indianization was the work of Indian traders and merchants, although later the travels of Buddhist monks such as Atisha became important. Southeast Asian rulers enthusiastically adopted elements of raja dharma,
• (Hindu and Buddhist beliefs, codes and court practices)
• to legitimate their own rule • and constructed cities, such as Angkor,
• to affirm royal power by reproducing a map of sacred space derived from the Ramayana and Mahabharata.
• Southeast Asian rulers frequently adopted lengthy Sanskrit titles
• and founded cities, such as Ayutthaya in Thailand, named after those in the Indian epics.
• Most Indianized kingdoms combined both Hindu and Buddhist beliefs and practices in a syncretic manner.
• Kertanagara, the last king of Singhasari, described himself as Sivabuddha, a simultaneous incarnation of the Hindu god and the Buddha.
• Also a significant part of the current population in South East Asia has a trace of Indian ancestry from distant antiquity. Indian and Chinese cultures blended with native cultures These kingdoms prospered from the Spice Route, trade among themselves and the Indian kingdoms.
• The influence of Indian culture is visible in the script, grammar, religious observances, festivities, architecture and artistic idioms even today.
• The influence of Indian and Chinese cultures blended with native cultures, created a new synthesis. The Southeast Asian region was previously called by the name Indochina.
• The influence of Indian and Chinese cultures are both strongly visible in this region even today, with the majority of the region being Indianized and Vietnam Sinocized.
• The reception of Hinduism and Buddhism aided the civilization maturity of these kingdoms but also subjected them to aggression by Indian and Chinese rulers.
• Cultural practices like the performances of the Hindu epic, the Ramayana across all of Southeast Asia.
• Traces of Hindu culture are visible also in the Sanskrit etymology of words in Myanmar language, Malay language, Indonesian and other regional languages as well as personal names. The Chinese ruled Vietnam for a millennium, while the Chola dynasty of South India ruled over Srivijaya briefly.
• And though Southeast Asia is an economic powerhouse in its own right, the need to balance Chinese economic and political influence with that of India remains an important factor for the region.
• Cultural and trading relations between the powerful Chola kingdom of South India and the South East Asian Hindu kingdoms, led the Bay of Bengal to be called “The Chola Lake”
• and the Chola attacks on Srivijaya in the tenth century CE are the sole example of military attacks by Indian rulers against Southeast Asia. The Pala dynasty of Bengal, which controlled the heartland of Buddhist India maintained close economic, cultural and religious ties, particularly with Srivijaya.
• The subsequent arrival of Islam, by Arab traders,
• and Christianity, by Portuguese, Spanish and Dutch colonial rulers significantly weakened the connection with India.
• Chinese influence grew with the gradual migration of Chinese traders and merchants. Chinese influence dominated in Vietnam, although other states such as the Khmer empire and Malacca were drawn into Chna’s diplomatic orbit.
• While Buddhism remains the dominant religion in mainland Southeast Asia,
• Hinduism survives in Bali and
• Christianity is the dominant religion in the Philippines and eastern Indonesia.
The History of Burma (or Myanmar) is long and complex.
Several races of people have lived in the region, the oldest of which are probably the Mon or the Pyu. In the 9th century the Bamar (Burman) people migrated from the then China-Tibet border region into the valley of the Ayeyarwady, and now form the governing majority.
‘Bamars are descendants of Sakyans who are of the Aryan Race or of some other descendants of Aryans’.
Though there is ‘scarcely any race that can claim descent from exclusively one original race’, nevertheless, Burma’s proximity to India permits the claim that the Burmans have ‘an ornamental Aryan superstructure on the existing Mongoloid foundation’, resulting in some historians proclaiming that ‘Myanmars were descendants of Aryans’.
The history of the region comprises complexities not only within the country but also with its neighbouring countries, China, India, Bangladesh, Viet Nam, Laos and Thailand.
India has been particularly influential in Burmese culture as the cradle of Buddhism, and ancient Hindu traditions can still be seen in brahmins presiding over important ceremonies such as_
1. weddings
2. and ear-piercings
3. but most notably in Thingyan, the Burmese New Year festival.
Traditions of kingship including coronation ceremonies and formal royal titles as well as those of lawmaking were also Hindu in origin.
India has been particularly influential in Burmese culture as the cradle of Buddhism, and ancient Hindu traditions can still be seen in brahmins presiding over important ceremonies such as_
1. weddings
2. and ear-piercings
3. but most notably in Thingyan, the Burmese New Year festival. Traditions of kingship including coronation ceremonies and formal royal titles as well as those of lawmaking were also Hindu in origin.
1. Early history of Burma Humans lived in the region that is now Myanmar as early as 11,000 years ago, but the first identifiable civilisation is that of the Mon. The Mon probably began migrating into the area in about 3000 BC, and their first kingdom Suwarnabhumi (pronounced Suvanna Bhoum), was founded around the port of Thaton in about 300 BC.
Oral tradition suggests that they had contact with Buddhism via seafaring as early as the 3rd century BC, though definitely by the 2nd century BC when they received an envoy of monks from Ashoka. Much of the Mon’s written records have been destroyed through wars. The Mons blended Indian and Mon cultures together in a hybrid of the two civilisations.
By the mid-9th century, they had come to dominate all of southern Myanmar. From that time, Northern Burma was a group of city-states in a loose coalition.
The ‘King’ of each city-state would change allegiance as he saw fit, so throughout history.
1. Pyu, one of the three founding brothers of Shwe Bama village was believed to be mixture of three groups;
(i) one local inhabitant since Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age,
(ii) another came from India bringing in Hinduism and Buddhism along with their cultures and literatures successively
(iii) and the another group believed to came down from north, Tibeto-Burman group. Mon was also rumoured to have two groups of ancestors:
(i) One came down from above like
Shan, (ii) and another from India , Orrisa village and Talingna village bringing in Hinduism and Buddhism to our land. Talaings originated from the Talingana village of India and arrived to lower Burma , met and intermarried with Mons, who came down from Yunnan, spreads through Burma up to Thailand, Laos and Kambodia.
They give us the Buddhism arts, culture, literature etc.. Our Burmese spoken language was from Tibeto-Burman family and there are a lot of similarities with Chinese spoken language.
But our Burmese writing language was from India, Brami Script we took not from our native Mon but her cousin Mons resided in Thailand.
Settlements of Indian Migrants in Ancient Burma Orissa
Orissa, Indian Buddhist colonists, arrived lower Burma, settled and built pagodas since 500 BC.
Andhra Dynasty Hindu colonists, of Andhra Dynasty, from middle India (180 BC) established Hanthawaddy (Mon town) and Syriam (Ta Nyin or Than Lyin) in Burma.
Talaings or Mons Mons or Talaings, an Ethnic Minority Group of Myanmar, migrated from the Talingana State, Madras coast of Southern India. Mon

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