Stupid selection of English text book during the General Ne Win’s “socialist” era; “Annapurna.”

Stupid selection of Matriculation 10th Std. English text book during the General Ne Win’s “socialist” era; “Annapurna.”

We had to learn the numerous names of equipment and terminology about the snow-caped mountain climbing.
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I had learnt by heart all those vocabularies and zigzag climbing up and down of the sub groups of the team members. I got a very good marks about 70% (Distinction marks was 75) but from the age of 17 yr to now 67 yrs of age i.e. for 50 years most of them are useless.
Even when I try to talk with my Nepalis patient friends they don’t even know the Annapurna or Dauragiri mountains as they knew the names of the mountains in their local language.
These words are quite OK but there were few dozen rarely used words that I could not even recall @ http://mounteverestwondering.weebly.com/vocabulary.html
Important Vocabulary to Know

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Acclimatize When the human body gets used to new conditions, such as lower oxygen levels at great heights. Acclimatizing your body helps prevent altitude sickness. 


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Altitude The height above sea level. It is hard to breathe at high altitude since there is very little oxygen.


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Altitude sickness Tiredness, headaches, sickness, and light-headedness experienced in high mountains.


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Avalanche A large slide of snow (or rock) down a mountainside.   

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Base camp The place where climbers stay before climbing Mount Everest.


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Blizzard A heavy snowstorm with strong winds.   

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Continent A very large land mass. There are seven continents on Earth: North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and Antarctica.

Mount Everest is located in Asia.


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Cornice Overhanging mass of snow and ice along a ridge; shaped by the wind like the crest of a wave.

Edmund Hillary climbed up a crack formed by the side of Mount Everest and a cornice to reach the top of the mountain.


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Crampons Metal frames with spikes fitted onto the bottom of boots for climbing on hard snow or ice.


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Crevasse Large crack in a glacier that is often very deep.

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Death Zone The part of the mountain above 24,000 feet where there is too little oxygen in the air to support human life for more than a few days.

The box around the top of the mountain in this photo shows the part of Mount Everest that is called the Death Zone.


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Expedition A journey organized to achieve a particular goal. Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay were part of an expedition to climb Mount Everest.


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Frostbite Damage to the skin and body parts caused by extreme cold.


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Glacier A huge sheet of ice that moves slowly over land.


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Himalayas A mountain range that includes many of the highest mountains in the world. The Himalayas extend into six countries, including India, Nepal, and China.

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Hypothermia Occurs when a person’s body temperature drops below normal (98.6 degrees F) because of being exposed to cold temperatures. It’s characterized by shivering, confusion, exhaustion, and memory loss.

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Icefall A jumble of frozen blocks of ice. Icefalls are created when a glacier moves down a slope.

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Insulation Material used to keep heat from escaping. Mountaineers have to use special kinds of clothing to provide insulation against the cold.


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Mountaineer Climber of high mountains.


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Oxygen The gas in the air. We need oxygen to breathe. Mountaineers climbing Mount Everest use oxygen tanks to help them breathe.

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 Peak The top part of a mountain.


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Sherpa A member of a group of people living in Tibet and Nepal who live in the high Himalayas and are famous for their mountaineering skills.


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Snow blindness A painful eye condition caused by looking at the bright sunlight reflected by snow and ice. To prevent this, mountaineers wear snow goggles to protect their eyes.


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Summit The top or highest point on a mountain.

Now that you’ve learned about Mount Everest, visit the next page to test your knowledge!

Annapurna Massif

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia @ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annapurna_Massif

The Annapurna Himal from the northeast. Left to right: Annapurna II and IV (close together); a major col; Annapurna III and Gangapurna; Annapurna I.

Annapurna I[edit]

Annapurna I was the first 8,000-metre (26,200 ft) peak to be climbed.[5] Maurice Herzog and Louis Lachenal, of a French expedition led by Herzog (including Lionel Terray, Gaston Rébuffat, Marcel Ichac, Jean Couzy, Marcel Schatz, Jacques Oudot, Francis de Noyelle), reached the summit on 3 June 1950.[8] Ichac made a documentary of the expedition, called Victoire sur l’Annapurna. Its summit was the highest summit attained for three years, until the first successful ascent of Mount Everest. (However, higher non-summit points—at least 8,500 metres (27,900 ft)—had already been attained on Everest in the 1920s.) However, there is an argument that the 1920s attempt of Everest was successful and if this is true the Annapurna ascent would have been the first time people had survived an ascent of an eight-thousander.

Annapurna

by Maurice Herzog, Janet Adam Smith (Translator), Nea Morin(Translator), Eric Shipton (Introduction)
In 1950, no mountain higher than 8,000 meters had ever been climbed. Maurice Herzog and other members of the French Alpine Club had resolved to try. Their goal was a 26,493-foot Himalayan peak called Annapurna. But unlike other climbs, which draw on the experience of prior reconnaissance, the routes up Annapurna had never been analyzed before. Herzog and his team had to locate the mountain using sketchy, crude maps, pick out a single, untried route, and go for the summit. Annapurna is the unforgettable account of this dramatic and heroic climb, and of its harrowing aftermath. Although Herzog and his comrade Louis Lachenal reached the mountain’s summit, their descent was a nightmare of frostbite, snow blindness, and near death. With grit and courage manifest on every page, Herzog’s narrative is one of the great mountain-adventure stories of all time. (less) @ http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40175.Annapurna
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