Can anyone of us or our friends could get any records of Muslim mercenaries, soldiers and police…from the British military or police archives or armed forces museums or gazettes?

Can anyone of us or our friends could get any records of Muslim mercenaries, soldiers and police…from the British military or police archives or armed forces museums or gazettes?

In addition to that the persons transferred or seconded from the Indian railways, mercantile shipping companies etc.

Sometimes interesting facts like former President Obama’s grandfather was a Muslim chef in Allied Forces and posted in Burma.

After WW2, Otoman Empire lost, Muslim Turkey prisoners of war were brought into Burma by British. They had built the Masjid in Mandalay prison this is within the palace wall. They had helped dug the Meiktila lake and built the road from Thazi to Kalaw/Taungyi.

Regarding the transfers during British time…In late 1986, I had read on the front page of News Strait Time (Malaysian news paper) about the high ranking gov officers getting pensions. Amongst them I was surprized abot the Deputy CID Director Maung’s picture and his biodata. Recorded that he was transferred out because some problem with his superiors in Bama Police (under British) before WW2. He never want to go back Burma but worked hard and slowly promoted in CID, Bukit Amman Police HQ in Malaysia.

Early Sikhs were police, convicts and mercenary soldiers
Read more at http://www.thestar.com.my/opinion/letters/2017/05/08/early-sikhs-were-police-convicts-and-mercenary-soldiers/#XMh5ar0ZjSPQ4kYj.99

Monday, 8 May 2017

Early Sikhs were police, convicts and mercenary soldiers

I REFER to Star TV’s recent video titled “Sikhs of Malaya: Gone but not forgotten”. It is a welcome step in the right direction to portray that our beloved nation today is the result of the blood, sweat and tears of various ethnic groups.

However, it has numerous factual errors which must be rectified to ensure accurate documentation of the history of Malaysian Sikhs.

First, the Sikhs started immigrating to Malaya in the 1870s (and not 1900s as stated in the video) mainly to serve in the police and paramilitary forces.

The pioneer Sikh police recruits (besides Pathans and Punjabi Muslims totalling 95 men) were enlisted by Captain Tristram Speedy at Lahore, Punjab in 1873 to help Ngah Ibrahim (territorial chief of Larut, Perak) restore law and order in Larut. Trade and tin mining in Larut were disrupted by frequent fighting between two warring Chinese clans (Ghee Hin and Hai San). By July 1, 1878, there were 247 Sikhs in the Perak police force.

Subsequently, 40 Sikhs joined the Selangor police force in 1884 and by 1889 the Sikh Contingent in Selangor totalled 128 men.

By 1890, the “First Battalion Perak Sikhs” had 713 Sikhs; the police force of Sungai Ujong had 75 Sikhs; and the Sikh Contingent in Pahang totalled 154 men.

It is important to note that before the enlistment of police recruits by Captain Speedy, there were in 1857 about 60-70 Sikh convicts in Singapore.

Another little known fact is that there was a garrison of 100 Sikh mercenary soldiers (recruited from the Straits Settlements) stationed at Kuala Selangor in 1871 to assist Tengku Kudin who was involved in a civil war against Raja Mahdi.

Many of these Sikh mercenary soldiers were subsequently killed in the Selangor Civil War (1867-1873).

Second, the Sikhs involved in the Battle of Kampar were defending Malaya against Japanese invasion and not fighting “to seek independence for Malaya” as erroneously stated in the video.

Third, in 1931 there were already about 20,000 Sikhs in Malaya. Perak had the largest number of Sikhs, followed by Selangor and Singapore. Before the Second World War, Sikhs were found in most parts of Malaya with concentrations in or around the large towns.

Hence, to imply in the video that the Sikhs started immigrating to Malaya in large numbers after the Battle of Kampar (Dec 30, 1941 to Jan 2, 1942) is incorrect.

Fourth and finally, the title of the video itself is rather misleading. There are still thousands of Malayan Sikhs (including me) who are still “alive and kicking” and not “gone”.

DR RANJIT SINGH MALHI

Kuala Lumpur

Read more at http://www.thestar.com.my/opinion/letters/2017/05/08/early-sikhs-were-police-convicts-and-mercenary-soldiers/#XMh5ar0ZjSPQ4kYj.99

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s